Secret Data Sunday – Iraq Family Health Survey

The WHO-sponsored Iraq Family Health Survey (IFHS) led to a nice publication in the New England Journal of Medicine that came complete with an editorial puff piece extolling its virtues.  According to the NEJM website this publication has generated 60 citations and we’re still counting.   If you cast a net wider than just medical publications then the  citation count must run well into the hundreds.

But the IFHS virtues don’t stop there.  The NEJM paper, and the accompanying report, are well written and supply plenty of good methodological information about the survey.  The authors are pretty up front about the limitations of their work, notably that they had to skip interviews in some areas due to security concerns.  Moreover, the IFHS is an important survey not least because its estimate of 150,000 violent deaths discredited the Burnham et al. estimate of 600,000 violent deaths for almost exactly the same time period.  (The Burnham et al. survey hid its methodology and was afflicted by serious ethical and data integrity problems. )

I have cited the IFHS multiple times in my own work and generally believe in it.  At the same time, the IFHS people did several questionable things with their analysis that I would like to correct, or at least investigate, by reanalyzing the IFHS data.

But here’s the rub.  The WHO has not released the IFHS dataset.

I and other people have requested it many times.  The field work was conducted way back in 2006.  So what is the WHO waiting on?

I’ll leave a description of my unrealized reanalysis to a future post. This is because my plans just don’t matter for the issue at hand; the IFHS data should be in the public domain whether or not I have a good plan for analyzing them.  (See this post on how the International Rescue Committee hides its DRC data in which I make the same point.)

There is an interesting link between the IFHS and the Iraq Child and Maternal Mortality Survey, another important dataset that is also unavailable.  The main point of contact for both surveys is Mohamed Ali of the WHO.  Regarding the IFHS. Mohamed seemed to tell me in an email that only the Iraqi government is empowered to release the dataset.  If so, this suggests a new (at least for me) and disturbing problem;

Apparently, the WHO uses public money to sponsor surveys but then sells out the general public by ceding their data distribution rights to local governments, in this case to Iraq.  

This is practice of allowing governments benefiting from UN-sponsored research to withhold data from the public that pays for the research is unacceptable .  It’s great that the WHO sponsors survey research in needy countries but open data should be a precondition for this service.

 

 

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